On 22 April the world’s first-ever March for Science will be held on Earth Day, to raise awareness and focus on climate change and other environmental issues.

Earth Day is a global event observed worldwide with various celebrations to honour the earth. The first Earth Day in 1970 was established as a result of the warnings scientists had been making for years about our environment. Since then, Earth Day Network’s mission has been to educate and activate the environmental movement worldwide. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.

“As we face the realities of climate change – unpredictable temperatures, endangered species, and an increasing number of severe weather events – ensuring that our children are prepared to become environmentally literate citizens is more essential than ever.” – Dan Abrams, Director of Earth Day

This year they will continue to recognise the concerns and the work of dedicated scientists. Their campaigns help create a greener, more sustainable future through focus on climate change, green cities, green schooling and education, reforestation and endangered species. This year also marks the first anniversary of the Paris Climate Agreement.

By March for Science

By March for Science

March for Science

This is also the first year the March for Science will be held. The March for Science will be held in the National Mall in Washington DC, and in more than 400 cities around the world; it’s even possible to join the march virtually. The marches are a celebration of science and are about the recognition of the role science plays in our current lives. It’s the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role of science that serves the common good.

Websites:
Earth Day
March for Science