A new installation at the Leipzig Panometer this month takes visitors 3,800 metres below sea level to the Titanic shipwreck.

Austrian-born artist Yadegar Asisi opened the Leipzig Panometer in 2003 in a converted gasometer. Built around 1909, it was a cylindrical building to store mains gas until 1977. Following extensive renovations, Yadegar Asisi has used it to create 1:1 scale panoramas, surrounding visitors with a single image. The panoramic pictures stretch to 105 metres in circumference, making them some of the largest images in the world.

Leipzig Panometer by Asisi © Leipzig Tourism and Marketing

Leipzig Panometer by Asisi © Leipzig Tourism and Marketing

On 28 January 2017, the newest installation will be revealed: TITANIC. The viewpoint uses an artificial light concept and perspective distortion to show the scale of the disaster thousands of metres below sea level. The wreck is shown broken into two pieces, showing everyday items, technical equipment and luggage.

Yadegar Asisi’s focus is not so much the 1912 maritime disaster itself, but the sinking of a luxury liner as an example of the arrogance of man, who places his creative efforts above the laws of creation. State-of-the-art technical achievements came up against the forces of nature in the Titanic disaster, and Asisi’s exhibition reflects the hubris of mankind. This Panorama shows how thousands of tonnes of steel and high-tech equipment of the 52,000 tonne liner are gradually corroding on the ocean bed and being reclaimed by nature.

TITANIC © Leipzig Panometer

TITANIC © Leipzig Panometer

Previous Panorama exhibitions at Leipzig Panometer have included:

  • Mount Everest and the view from the Valley of Silence, showing Western journeys and Buddhist settlements;
  • Ancient Rome, following Constantine the Great’s entry into the city;
  • Amazonia, showing flora, fauna and a 60:1 model of a mosquito;
  • Leipzig 1813, marking the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Leipzig;
  • Great Barrier Reef, an immersion in the most famous coral reef in the world.

Website: TITANIC at Leipzig Panometer


Carl Goes Leipzig

Carl Goes Leipzig is the city guide for entrepreneurs, creatives and the generally curious who want to become a citizen of Leipzig for the duration of their stay, whether it’s for three days, three weeks or three months.

We’re travelling to Leipzig during 2017 – keep an eye on the Carl Goes website for more information as it emerges!

Carl Goes Leipzig

Carl Goes Leipzig